Tag Archives: fall

Egg Drop Soup

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Fall is one of my favorite times of the year.  I love it when the leaves on the deciduous trees in my neighborhood turn canary yellow, fiery orange and bright red.  Fresh picked apples, pears and pumpkins are some of the last crops sold at the local farmers markets as the late summer harvest winds down.  Remnants of my little garden will be tossed in a compost bin and added back to the soil next year.  Seeds will be saved.  Pots need to be scrubbed and cleaned and tomato cages need to be stacked.  In a few short months, the seed catalogs for next year will be in my mailbox.  Can you believe it?  I’m already planning next year’s garden.

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On the flip side, fall marks the beginning of the cold and flu season.  People walking around with sniffles and barking coughs become increasingly noticeable.  At the grocery store, over the counter cold remedies and boxes of tissue seem to fly off the store shelves.  Hand sanitizer and constant hand washing does help in the prevention of colds but, sometimes there’s no avoiding it.  Once you got it, you’ve got it.  We’ve all had it.  Unfortunately, most of the time, you just have to let it simply run its course…

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One of my favorite dishes to prepare while dealing with the common cold is Egg Drop Soup.  My Egg Drop Soup is similar to what you may find at your favorite Chinese restaurant.  My Egg Drop Soup is slightly different for I like to add finely chopped carrots, celery and use galangal root instead of ginger.  It’s easy to prepare, mild in flavor and has a wonderful soul soothing chicken soup like quality about it.  I love curling up on the couch with a good book and wrapping my hands around a warm little cup of my Egg Drop Soup.  Egg Drop Soup certainly won’t cure your cold but it may help you feel just a little bit better.  Enjoy!  Tessa

Ingredients:

  • 1 quart chicken stock (reserve 1 cup)
  • 1/2 cup celery (chopped fine)
  • 1/2 cup carrot (chopped fine)
  • 1 slice dried galangal root
  • 1/8 tsp ground white pepper
  • 1 1/4 Tbs cornstarch
  • salt to taste
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 or 2 tsp low sodium soy sauce (optional)
  • chives or green onion for garnish

In a medium sized saucepan over medium high heat add 3 cups chicken stock, celery, carrot, galangal, and white pepper.  Bring to a slow boil.  Cook until the celery and carrots are tender.  Meanwhile, in a separate bowl mix together the cornstarch and 1 cup of chicken stock.  Add cornstarch mixture to soup and stir well.  In a small bowl lightly beat eggs.

Now, grab a spoon and stir the boiling soup in a single direction.  Slowly add the egg mixture to the soup stirring gently.  Taste and correct your seasonings.  Remove galangal root.  Add soy sauce if desired and garnish with chopped chives or green onions.  Makes about 4 – 1 cup servings.

How to make a Basil Flavor Bomb…

My summer garden is officially done for the year.  Finished.  Toast.  See ya.  Bye.   All due to our very first fall frost of the season…  However, I would like to point out that I gathered all that was edible the night before the inevitable freezing temperatures hit.  I always pay close attention to the local weather forecast, my outdoor digital thermometer and the sky.  The frost lasted only about 15 minutes on Sunday morning but by then my basil plants were stripped, tomatoes were harvested and the last of the red bell peppers were gathered in my bucket.  The only things that the frost was able to take were the fruitless plants that remained.  Now those wilted plants safely reside in my compost bin to be used as a soil amendment for my brand new garden next spring.

I am always sad to see my summer garden leave for the year.  However, I look at it this way.  I have learned many horticultural lessons that I can apply in the following growing season.  Not to mention, I can begin planning my new garden canvas…  I make it a point to make every year in my teensy little garden better than the last.

I just love fresh picked sweet basil.  I use it in my kitchen all the time.  I like to grow basil in my garden rather than buy it at the store for I make sure that it is organic and pesticide free.  This year I almost grew too much.  Almost…

Basil is so amazingly fragrant and has such bright beautiful green leaves.  Basil is used in a variety of Italian dishes and many dishes in Southeast Asian countries such as Indonesia, Thailand and Vietnam.  The variety shown above is sweet basil.  I was so fortunate that my sweet basil plants grew like a weeds this year.  On the other hand, I had limited luck with my Thai and purple basil this year.  I’m not one to give up that easily, so I will try again next year.  Maybe by planting them in a different location or in a large pot.

Basil Flavor Bombs…  This is what to make when you have a boat load of fresh basil to deal with all at one time.  Basically, they are easy to make frozen basil cubes that you can add to soups, stews, or sauces throughout the winter season.  It saves money, tastes fabulous and is less wasteful.  I got this amazingly delicious recipe from Hannah at Rise and Shine.  Thank you Hannah!  Be sure to stop by her site, say hello and check out some other wonderful recipes for preserving herbs in oi!  Enjoy!  Tessa

Ingredients:

  • several or just a few cups of packed fresh picked basil (washed, dried, stems removed)
  • olive oil (as needed)
  • salt (to taste)

Add basil leaves to a food processor.  Pulse while adding olive oil.  Add oil until the basil turns to a thick paste.  Pulse until nearly pureed.  Scrap inside of food processor with a spatula.  Add salt, pulse lightly and spoon into ice cube trays. Cover with plastic wrap and toss into the freezer.  Once frozen, remove from ice cube trays and toss into a Ziploc plastic bag or tightly covered container.  Freeze again.  Each cube makes about a 2 tablespoon sized flavor bomb.  Keep frozen.

Note:  When using the frozen basil cubes be sure to add them near completion of your dish.  You want retain as much of the bright basil flavor as possible.